Mango Gets Into the Bohemian Spirit for Spring 2016

Fashion

Tie-dye prints, relaxed lines and billowy gowns… Mango unveils its Bohemian Spirit April 2016 lookbook, alternating casual-chic proposals with more sensual, yet always hippy-chic and exquisitely embroidered ensembles. Mango’s Bohemian Spirit spring 2016 lookbook took Dutch model Esti van Balen to Cadaqués, a precious coastal town in Costa Brava, in the province of Girona, Spain, along with Belgium-born Barcelona/Paris-based fashion photographer Quentin de Briey, who perfectly captured the whole bohemian essence of the Spanish brand translating it into an even more relaxed, sun-soaked mood

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook

De Briey also gave this lookbook an artistic, one-of-a-kind turn, thanks to his attention to details, passion for uncontaminated landscapes and vintage-looking pictures that are one of his hallmarks. Besides working in and out of his studios for many international labels, De Briey has a long-time collaboration with Vogue Spain, where you can get acquainted with his exquisite work. Like most of Quentin de Briey’s editorial campaigns, this Mango pictorial also deals more with art rather than being mere advertising means, as the landscape, the models and the outfits look like shots from another, glamorous era.

This has, of course, to do with Mango’s choice to focus on easy-to-wear garments in vibrant, color-blocking and ton-sur-ton earthy colors as well, as they quickly change their appearance becoming haute couture kind of pieces, especially thanks to the loads of frills, intricate crochet embroideries and lovely openwork detailing that decorate most of the proposals. Aside from the vast array of colorful ensembles, Mango came up also with some dreamlike total white proposals that could be worn either at the seaside or at one of these upcoming summery parties, ranging from short late-Sixties-inspired models to airy A-line dresses.

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook

Decorative embroideries, cutouts and lace appliqués flirtatiously get along pretty well with the collection’s casual denim jackets and feminine accessories, among which it will be very hard to choose the metallic golden or the silver ones. Aside from the bracelets, this Bohemian Spirit lookbook doesn’t rely that much on a boho-approved accessory line, denoting the label’s willingness to prove ‘less is more’ indeed especially when it comes to summer boho looks. That’s also the case for the clothing line itself, wherein lightweight fabrics almost solely cover the models’ bodies acting as elegant ladylike frocks or waist-hugging strap dresses. As for the latter, it’s indeed with the strappy dresses that Mango fully goes into its sexiest mode, yet always choosing to bare either the upper parts with large, plunging sleeveless sides, or the legs with short hems.

Button-up denim skirts emphasize the campaign’s playful atmosphere, while the back-stitched leather strap sandals complete most of the looks accentuating their boho-chic appeal. Cropped silhouettes, along with zigzagged navy sweaters, crop style wide-leg trousers and skirts with ruffled hems add a marine vibe to the entire collection, making it possible for those who prefer cozier pieces when it comes to summer, to combine easiness with a Sixties-inspired, Provence-based glamorous style.

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook

Mango Bohemian Spirit Spring 2016 Lookbook


Tag: VENETA

comments(0) views(373)

BALENCIAGA HIGHLIGHT CITY BAG

Fashion

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-2

The legendary bag that contributed to the success of Balenciaga – the iconic, the classic and the never-go-out-of-style.

To date, the Balenciaga Classic City Bag has gone through many changes; from goatskin to lambskin, thick leather to thin leather (and other way around), different hardware and even introducing the mini version of the Classic City Bag.

Introducing the new motorcycle-inspired handbag style, the name is Balenciaga Highlight City Bag. And besides that it is made from durable soft-grained calfskin leather, it is also refined with shiny palladium hardware. More beautiful is the contrasting white leather edges; it adds a bold yet impressive touch to it.

All the elements of the original Classic City Bag have been transferred, so no worries.

The handles have been hand-stitched; it comes with a removable shoulder strap so you have multiple options to carry. The zipper pull is fine-tuned with special leather tassel.

What’s more? The interior zipper pocket is engraved with Balenciaga logo plaque; it also features a double phone compartment in the inside and a leather-framed mirror.

For the serious bag collection, you need one of these Balenciaga-history-pieces in your wardrobe.

Balenciaga Mini Highlight City Bag
Measuring: 9.4’ x 6.2’ x 3.5’ (W x H x D) inches
Priced at $1445 USD or €1025 euro

Balenciaga Highlight City Bag
Measuring 14.8’ x 9.4’ x 5.5’ (W x H x D) inches
Priced at $2095 USD or €1495 euro

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-8

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-3

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-5

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-6

Balenciaga-highlight-city-Bag-4

Tag: VENETA SUMMER

comments(0) views(568)

The high street does cater for grown-ups - but you have to hunt it out

Fashion

Olive cotton twill shirt, £115, Denim pleat front trouser £115, Stripe cotton linen long sleeve tee £65, (toa.st)

For an industry where perception is all, fashion is often amazingly cack-handed at managing its target audiences’ first impressions. One minute they’re featuring whacky octogenarians in their advertising, which would be fine if their message was consistently age-blind. But the following season it’s back to the meager diet of blank looking teenagers. No wonder one of the most commonly heard complaints among 40 plussers is that there’s nothing for them on the high street.

There is. Jigsaw, which re-launched itself under a new head of design, Shailina Parti, last year and went decidedly upmarket in its aesthetic, fabrics and tailoring is one. All Saints, under the creative direction of Wil Beadle is another. The Kooples (pricey but excellent tailoring, and past 35 isn’t that what we want?) Massimo Dutti, Cos, Whistles, Karen Millen, & Other stories and Zara all do a good job providing a base line of modern classics, spiced with seasonal updates. In reality you could go into almost any shop on the high street and find at least a couple of items most most of us could wear. But would you?

Maris Panel t-shirt, £195, and Lark grosgrain trim trousers, £325 (jigsaw-online.com)

Maris Panel t-shirt, £195, Jigsaw; and Lark grosgrain trim trousers, £325, Jigsaw

Because back in the shifting sands of perception, the notion that retailers and designers are failing grown-ups – that maybe they don’t even want our business - persists.  Sizing is part of it – the resistance among the “upmarket” sector to accommodate breasts and size 16 waists. But presentation is a bigger factor.

In a bid not to seem “old”, brands often succumb to ludicrously young looking sulky  models (smiling is so middle of the road), garish shop fronts and chaotic changing rooms. Or they go to the other extreme, pushing mumsy types in bland, shapeless, frumpy clothing at us. Thanks. But no.  

Then again, no one said fashion retail was easy. Success depends on constant recalibration. Toast, adored by a discriminating audience when it launched two decades ago for its fluid, understated silhouettes and subtle, “in-between” colours has ventured so far into flowy shapes  in recent years that it was wading into tent-land – a direction not lost on its sophisticated founders, Jamie and Jessica Seaton. The Seatons have recruited some new design and management talent.

Cotton Ramie dress, £250 (toa.st)

Cotton Ramie dress, £250, Toast 

As a result the company has developed its own fabrics, pared back to its original sense of elegance ease and re-done all its pattern blocks. Shoulders are narrower, torsos look slimmer, and as a result those flowy dresses look chic and stylish (think Tilda Swinton’s luscious Dior wardrobe in the otherwise painfully dreadful A Bigger Splash) rather than baggy. Trousers are wide and cropped above the ankle. Jackets are neat. Denim is dyed using proper indigo pigments. Next winter’s velvets,  pyjama tops and loungewear (not the usual cashmere joggers, but lovely A-line midis in dusky shades of pink and mauve) and sloppy-Jo jumpers (same yarns as Celine) are definitely worth adding to your future buy-list.

It’s a happy example of a company that always had spot-on imagery raising its product to match. “Basically we sat in a room,” says Jamie Seaton, “and thrashed out what we thought Toast’s core appeal was when it started, deciding it was luxury and elegant and bringing it up to date”.  

Stripe Cotton Top, £115; Cotton Twill Skirt, £110; Moheda Clog, £49 (toa.st) 

Stripe Cotton Top, £115; Toast; Cotton Twill Skirt, £110; Toast; and Moheda Clog, £49, Toast

Toast is a comparatively niche, upmarket company that can afford to be whimsical (you can also buy jam on its website – it’s called Toast, after all). It’s tougher for behemoths to act in an agile way. That’s why the crowds who turned up at the M&S Marble Arch flagship this week to witness the launch of its collaboration with Alexa Chung were so noteworthy. “It’s nice to see queues in M&S," said the company’s Style Director Belinda Earle on Wednesday, relief etched across her face.

It was shortly after 5pm on launch day and there was indeed a queue, snaking through the front of the store and outside down the block, waiting patiently to meet and be photographed with Chung. M&S have been promoting this collaboration – which saw Chung visit the M&S archives in Leeds, select 31 of her favourite pieces and oversee their re-imagining for 2015 – for months, focusing predominantly on social media.

Alexa Chung wears an M&S Archive by Alexa Frances trench, £89, and white Harry blouse, £35 (marksandspencer.com)  
CREDIT: REX

Alexa Chung wears an M&S Archive by Alexa Frances trench, £89,M&S; White Harry blouse, £35, M&S 

This was about reaching a demographic not so much resistant as totally oblivious to M&S’s other ranges. Chung is undoubtedly admired in fashion circles for her innate style, but would her appeal extend to the large audiences which M&S must, by dint of its size, serve? What if the crash barriers erected on the pavements outside proved unnecessary? More than one professional reputation rested on that not happening.

No worries on that score, even if the queue was strikingly well behaved (none of the smash and grab gangs seen at the H&M/Balmain collaboration last Autumn). Instead, what was striking about the M&S queue, other than its existence, was its composition: 50 somethings, 40 somethings, 30 somethings, even some of those elusive teens.  

We’ll see the final tally of units sold, in a few weeks. That will be interesting, because while certain items such as the much talked about ruffle yoked shirt had sold out in smaller sizes by the end of the first day in main (read fashion conscious) branches, it’s still available today online, suggesting that away from the quasi panic that sets in at retail events like these, customers are still deciding whether they really want to revisit the early 80s pie-crust necklines.   Personally, although I love the Archive by Alexa khaki trench and ruffled shirt (but not for me), I’ve found more sophisticated cuts in M&S’s Limited Edition and Autograph ranges, particularly the bottle green leather wrap skirt (£129), wide trousers (from £32.50) and a less exaggerated ruffled chiffon blouse (£29.50).

Leather belted a-line wrap skirt, £129, M&S

Leather belted a-line wrap skirt, £129, M&S

But it comes back to perception, and without Chung’s endorsement, no one under 30 would look at those, because hardly anyone under 30 ventures through M&S’s doors. Until this week. Which brings us to the real aim of this venture, which is to shift the public’s collective notion about who shops at M&S.

In 2012 Verdict, the retail analysts, announced that the average M&S was 65. While there are, increasingly, plenty of stylish, fashionable 65 year olds, and with more disposable income than teens, selling to them – or for that matter to any woman over 40 – is complex. A 40 plusser already has a lot of clothes already and plenty of other interests on which to spend her money if she doesn’t find what she wants on the high street. She’s not looking for cheap thrills but long term fixes; not  throwaway trends, but something harder to define.

Stripe coat, Fine cotton slubby long sleeve tee, George trouser

Stripe coat, £225, Toast; Fine cotton slubby long sleeve tee, £39, Toast; and George trouser, £95, Toast.

Call it style, and we all know how elusive that is. The 40 plusser, or diamond generation, expects quality, chic cuts, a nod to the catwalks, a reassuring aura of investment, but also an injection of youthfulness – and the same rush of adrenaline when she buys this fabled item as she used to get from something she knew she might only wear two or three times.  No wonder retailers sometimes seem clueless about how to talk to her. She’s been patronized and ignored so long she’s not sure herself, but she’s certainly not seduced by emaciated, gobby looking models in overstyled poses or by mumsy types in frumpy cardigans.  

At 33, Chung may well represent a neat intersection in the age pie-chart where mothers and daughters meet: quirky yet classic. But the truth is, mothers and daughters have long shared a liking for some of the same clothes – well cut biker jackets and boots, pea coats,  trenches, shirts and jeans. And it’s not hard to add in a few of those details that attract grown-ups, without repelling 20 somethings: sleeves, co-ordinating outfits, expensive looking accessories, hem lines that don’t stop mid thigh…

Get those right, trust in your customer to appreciate them, and the right words should come. Just remember – don’t patronize us.

Tag: SHEARLING Virevolte

comments(0) views(467)

MIT TIMEX IN LONDON

Fashion

Vor etwa einer Woche habe ich zwei Tage im wunderschönen London verbracht. Timex hatte ein paar Blogger eingeladen, um die neue Fairfield Weekender Kollektion sowie die Stadt zu entdecken. Für alle, die Timex nicht kennen: es ist ein amerikanisches Uhrenlabel mit einer langen Tradition. Bereits seit 1854 ist das Brand darauf spezialisiert nicht nur stylische, sondern auch besonders hochwertige und innovative Uhren zu produzieren. Die Fairfield Weekender Kollektion ist ihre neueste Uhrenkollektion, die Spaß macht, aber auch super cool und stylisch ist. Es sind die perfekten Uhren für den Alltag, mit denen ihr nicht nur jeden eurer Looks aufwertet, sondern sie geben euch auch die Möglichkeit immer pünktlich zu sein ;)

Während der zwei Tage in London haben wir die Möglichkeit bekommen die Stadt gemeinsam mit dem Uhrenbrand Timex zu erkunden. Alice und ich hatten denselben Flug und sind so gemeinsam angereist. Wir kamen gegen frühen Mittag im Mondrian Oriental – unserem Zuhause für die Zeit in London – an und bekamen nach einer kurzen Auffrischung im Hotelzimmer erst einmal Mittagessen im Rooftop Restaurant des Hotels. Hier hat dann auch Giorgio Galli, Design Director von Timex, ein wenig etwas über die Marke sowie die neue Kollektion erzählt. Danach ging es auch schon direkt weiter im Program: wir sind für eine private Food Tour zum Borough Market gefahren. Und verdammt, dort gab es unglaublich viele Leckereien! Ich habe sogar das erste Mal Austern probiert. Viele hatten mit immer davon abgeraten und gesagt, dass sie nicht schmecken, aber ehrlich gesagt waren sie gar nicht so schlecht. Habt ihr schonmal Austern gegessen?

Der erste Tag klingt schon ziemlich aufregend, oder? Er war aber noch lange nicht vorbei! Nach der Borough Market Food Tour sind wir erst einmal zurück zum Hotel, wo wir uns ein wenig ausruhen konnten und für den letzten Programpunkt des Tages fertig machen konnten. Abends fand nämlich noch eine Party im Shoreditch House statt. Hier wurde die S/S Kollektion 2016 präsentiert, es gab jede Menge Essen und sogar einen Fotoautomaten. Highlight war jedoch die Popcorn-Maschine! Ich meine, was will man mehr?!

Der erste Tag in London war wirklich großartig, aber auch ein wenig anstrengend, da ich sehr lange auf den Beinen war. Aus diesem Grund hatte ich mich dazu entschieden am zweiten Tag eine Massage im Spa des Mondrian Oriental zu genießen. Eigentlich wollte ich noch ein wenig durch die Stadt laufen, am Ende habe ich aber die gesamte Zeit bis zur Abfahrt zum Flughafen im Spa verbracht. Manchmal muss man es sich eben auch gut gehen lassen ;) Ich hatte eine tolle Zeit in London und habe viele neue und vor allem nette Leute kennengelernt. Am besten schaut euch doch direkt all die Fotos an, damit ihr einen Eindruck von meiner Zeit mit Timex in London bekommt. xx


Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Timex_Mondrian_General_2016_0002

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Timex_Mondrian_General_2016_0015

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Timex_Mondrian_General_2016_0016

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Timex_Watches_General_2016_0002

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Jacqueline_Zelwis_2016_0006

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Jacqueline_Zelwis_2016_0003

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Jacqueline_Zelwis_2016_0017

Ella_Sadika_Audrey_Karls_Jacqueline_Zelwis_2016_0012

comments(0) views(360)

THE CFDA RELEASED A GUIDEBOOK FOR DESIGNERS TRANSITIONING TO IN-SEASON SHOWS

Fashion

Proenza Schouler's fall 2016 runway show during New York Fashion Week. Photo: JP Yim/Getty Images

When the CFDA released its (slightly obvious) results from Boston Consulting Group's in-depth study on New York Fashion Week, it was clear — the fashion industry was in need of a change. So far, the organization has taken steps towards offering options from which both designers and brands can choose in regards to their preferred show schedule format. And for those considering in-season activations — i.e., the more consumer-facing shows and events — the CFDA has created a guidebook that outlines five steps on to do exactly that for September or February. However, the document specifies that these tactics are not a "rigid set of rules" or an "official timeline" for those transitioning into this new model. Let's have a look, shall we?

Step 1: The first step requires that fashion businesses determine exactly what they want to get out of NYFW. If these objectives include creating buzz among consumers whilst building your brand and acquiring press coverage, then you're on the right track! Head on over to step two.

Step 2: The second step suggests maintaining relationships with retailers and buyers through intimate, smaller presentations that showcase the collection expected to arrive in stores six months later (so, the fall collection in February). Who should attend this invite-only event? According to the CFDA, that can include a limited list of "influencers," business partners and long-lead press. In addition, designers should keep close tabs on releasing imagery in order to maintain interest until the collection's in-season activation.

Step 3: The in-season, consumer-facing extravaganza! Be sure to invite "new media/short-lead" press to cover the event — or whichever type of social setting you think is best for the brand and its consumers. Partner up with retailers. Find sponsors, also known as cash money. Host a music concert! An art show! An Ayahuasca ceremony! Go ham!

Step 4: Brands should determine their "buy now" format and figure out how to handle the transitional season. The CFDA recommends going the season-less route, naming such future collections as Collection 1, Collection 2 or Yeezy Season 3, but that's already taken. Or, perhaps offer a hybrid collection that includes shoppable pieces or items that will be available in three months time, as well as a handful of looks that will show up six months later (and now our brain hurts). The easiest option, though, is to ditch the runway altogether and hold press appointments.

Step 5: By now, it's time to review and assess everything. What worked? What didn't? What can be improved? Then, the CFDA asks that you share any and all feedback with them. See? That's not so bad.

The guidebook also includes a handy glossary, should you find yourself confusing "see now, buy now" with "buy now, wear now," or still can't figure out the difference is between "cruise," "resort" and "pre-spring" collections. (Hint: They're all the freakin' same.)

Tag: MIKAEL CLUTCH

comments(0) views(391)

Gamers can ditch their Armani for this Pac-Man suit

Fashion

pac-man-suit-opposuits-1

While corporate suits stick to solids, plaids and pin-stripes, expressing truly charismatic traits are only left to neckties. While they hardly get the point across without seeing like ‘trying too hard’, OppoSuits has dropped something that with intentions that are plainly loud and clear. The Pac-Man Suit would leave a bad taste with most urban outfitters but for those seeking exclusivity at a gaming summit in Japan, this one would fit right in.

pac-man-suit-opposuits-2
OppoSuits is a company that has consistently provided with some interesting designs and thematics for those who would like to throw in some life into the world of suiting. The suit, tie and trouser ensemble carries the typical interface of the Pac-Man game, complete with the maze-like grid, ghosts and a number of Pac-Men all across the seam. This would make viewing the coat or the wearer a difficult task but what it does put into place is the perspective of just how loyal an 8-bit fan, the wearer really is.
pac-man-suit-opposuits-5
OppoSuits was founded in 2012 and has won its place in the hearts of the radically dressed. From Halloween coats to a suit completely coated with cannabis leaf patterns, the company has shocked and surprised the world of fashion. Why not?

Tag: CC

comments(0) views(505)

Powered by Designer Fashion Handbags Handmade, Vintage And Unique Goods Fashion Bags Clothes sitemap